Google Once Again Changes Search Results After Liberal Journalist Complains

"You should find that particular featured snippet now removed."

Image Credits: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.

A liberal journalist complained to Google on Tuesday that when she searches “Boston’s black neighborhoods” the “first result that pops up is a list of Boston’s ‘worst’ neighborhoods.”

“So I do a @Google search for ‘Boston’s black neighborhoods’ and the 1st result that pops up is a list of Boston’s ‘worst’ neighborhoods,” The Trace’s Jennifer Mascia tweeted. “How does that happen?”

Mascia also complained about results in the “People also ask” box:

Google’s public search liaison Danny Sullivan responded apologizing for the search results and said “you should find that particular featured snippet now removed.”

While Roadsnacks.net’s “These Are The 5 Worst Boston Neighborhoods For 2018” was the top result as a result of the “featured snippet” before this liberal journalist complained, when I searched earlier Friday morning it was fourth:

The “People also ask” questions were also changed.

Two weeks ago, a pro-abortion Slate reporter said Google-owned YouTube “changed search results” for abortion “after I asked.”

The top result at the time, an anti-abortion video titled, “LIVE Abortion Video on Display,” was shoved down 39 pages in the results after she complained, meaning you had to go past around 190 videos to get what was the number one result the previous week.

While Google has been rigging all news-related YouTube search results to favor the corporate media for several months now, recently they’ve also begun featuring direct links to CNN’s website as the top search result for various terms:

Google CEO Sundar Pichai said during sworn testimony before congress that he leads the company “without political bias” and “to do otherwise would go against our core principles and our business interests.”

“It’s not possible for individual employees to manipulate our search results,” Pichai claimed while under oath. “We don’t manually intervene on any particular search. Providing users with access to high-quality information is sacrosanct.”