New Zealand Govt Pushes Gun Control Despite Not Knowing Where Shooter Got Guns

Left pushing for solution without fully knowing the problem

Image Credits: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images.

New Zealand’s government is already pushing for gun control despite the fact that their investigation into how the shooter obtained firearms is still in its preliminary stages.

So far, all that’s known about the shooter Brenton Tarrant’s acquisition of firearms is that he obtained a “category A” gun license in November 2017 and began legally purchasing them a month later.

“While work is being done as to the chain of events that lead to both the holding of this gun license and the possession of these weapons, I can tell you one thing right now. Our gun laws will change.” New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Saturday.

It’s not yet known where he purchased the weapons, but it’s unlikely they were from Australia given its severe restrictions of semi-automatic firearms, which Tarrant had used during the Christchurch mosque attack.

The New Zealand government is simply employing the Hegelian dialectic, or problem-reaction-solution model, to introduce gun control.

First, rather than blame the individual who perpetrated the attack, the government immediately identifies guns as the “problem” for the public to react to.

Then, when the public demands something be done to address the “problem,” the government proposes a “solution,” in this case gun control: a plan it had always intended to implement, but made easier to do so with public support.

Confiscation has always been the goal of leftist governments, and they will use any event they can to achieve it.

Notably, that seems to have also been Tarrant’s goal, as he stated in his 74-page manifesto that he chose to kill with firearms to spark a civil war in America over gun control.


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