Report: Covid “Whistleblowers” Are Making Money From Tattling On Those Who Break Rules

Image Credits: andresr / Getty Images.

A Reuters report that describes as “whistleblowers” students reporting on their classmates for breaking COIVD rules, also highlights that the authorities are paying them to walk around campuses and “enforce” social distancing measures and mask mandates.

“As some U.S. college students party, others blow the whistle,” the report states, noting that some are even making ‘undercover videos’ of their fellow student disobeying the rules and and handing the footage over to school authorities.

“At the University of Missouri, one senior is posting photos and videos on a “University of Misery” Twitter account that shows students gathered in large groups at pools, outside bars and other places – few of them wearing masks,” the report further states.

“The university has a form on its website where violations of the school’s COVID-19 guidelines can be anonymously reported, but posting on Twitter “adds a different level of accountability,”” the whistleblower snitch commented.

The University has expelled or suspended several students stemming from the tattling, according to the article.

The Reuters report continues:

Some schools like the University of Miami are actually paying students to enforce COVID-19 rules.

At Miami, 75 “public health ambassadors” are making $10 an hour to walk around campus and make sure that people wear masks and socially distance. Serious infractions can be flagged to university administrators.

Austin Pert, an ambassador and Miami senior, said that people generally comply with his requests. But Pert acknowledged the program has limitations: most violations do not take place during the day on university grounds.

Some students are fully onboard with the snitching, seeing it as an opportunity to get ahead of other students:

Ed Kellermann, a BU senior, said he would not hesitate to anonymously report a party, calling it a matter of “life or death” for Boston residents near campus.

Kellermann said reporting parties also increases the odds of completing the academic year on campus.

“We’re all very pro-snitch right now,” Kellermann said. “No one wants to get sent home.”

As we have documented at Summit News, several universities in the US have set up systems so students can report on each other if they see anyone breaking the Covid ‘rules’.


Owen invites Matt on the show, an Idaho father whose young son is being forced quarantined and contact traced by his tyrannical school.



WATCH ALL SHOWS

AUDIO